Thursday, 28 February 2013

The window-painting robot

Now for something different in the robotics world - a robot that can travel over a window or vertical surface less than 25mm thick, in order to paint the surface. You first create an image on a PC running custom processing software, which turns the image into data which is copied into the robot's Arduino sketch. The data contains information that directs the robot on its' travels. The robot is held in place with Neodymium magnets, and can also replicate the process on a floor or other flat horizontal surface for the faint-hearted.  You can see the process in action through the following video:

 

To recreate your own version, check out the instructions on the project page. And for more, we're on twitter and Google+, so follow us for news and product updates as well.

If you're new to Arduino, the first step is a solid board for your projects - our Freetronics Eleven - the Arduino-Uno compatible with low-profile USB socket, onboard prototyping space and easy to view LEDs:

 

DIY Arduino-controlled Miniature Elevator

If you're interested in modernising a doll house, adding an elevator to your LEGO world or just want to recreate "Damien: Omen II" with miniature figures, this next project by Arduino forum member "Don B" will suit nicely. Don has created a simple elevator system that has a full control system and can track the position of the car just as a real system would do. However the car location is determined by the use of an ultrasonic distance sensor at the bottom of the "shaft". It's not too difficult and a lot of fun, for example:

 

For more details, schematic and Arduino sketch visit the Arduino forum. And for more, we're on twitter and Google+, so follow us for news and product updates as well.

Want to make your own Arduino-controlled project with servos and more - but not sure how to start? Then the best way to learn is with out new Experimenter's Kit for Arduino:

The package includes a wide variety of parts, sensors and modules including: a servo motor, lights, buttons, switches, sound, sensors, breadboard, wires and more. Furthermore a Freetronics Eleven Arduino-compatible board is included to make this an extensive hobby experimenter, inventor and starter kit. However we don't leave you alone to figure it all out, included is a great project and instruction booklet, plus access to a supporting web page and software examples. In other words - this is everything you need to get started for a fun range of electronics and Arduino related projects! 

So to get started or for more information and to order, check out the product page.

Monitor twitter feeds via an Arduino

 If you're always wanting to watch a certain twitter feed or two, why not make a separate unit just for that purpose? Doing so has been demonstrated by Varut Rintanalert who uses an Ethernet-enabled Arduino board and an LCD module to do just that. It's programmed to monitor four feeds, however with modification you can change the feeds, or also have your Arduino react when a certain term or hashtag appears. It's a simple and fun project that shows how easy it is to work with Arduino and the Internet. 

For more information and the Arduino sketch, visit Varut's website. And for more, we're on twitter and Google+, so follow us for news and product updates as well.

If you need an LCD module for your next Arduino project - save time and move forward with the Freetronics LCD & Keypad shield. This convenient shield contains a bright 16x2 character LCD and five buttons that can be read from only one analogue input pin:

Wednesday, 27 February 2013

Automating electronic door locks with Arduino in the Smarthouse

Freetronics co-founder and home automation expert Jonathan Oxer has published the next fascinating instalment in the Superhouse.TV website that focuses on high technology and automation around the home. In this episode Jonathan discusses how to modify electronic door locks so that they can be controlled remotely (or locally) via Ethernet-enabled Arduino hardware. The process of integrating the electronic lock with Jonathan's home automation system is explained in the following video:


 

If you're interested in other topics within home automation, check out the rest of Superhouse.tv. And we're on twitter and Google+, so follow us for news and product updates as well.

As shown in the episode of Superhouse above, Jonathan uses the Freetronics EtherMega:

Quite simply the EtherMega is the fully-loaded Arduino-compatible board on the market today. Apart from being completely Arduino Mega2560-compatible, it includes full Ethernet interface, a microSD card socket, full USB interface, optional Power-over-Ethernet support and still has a circuit prototyping area with extra I2C interface pins. So if your project is breaking the limits, upgrade to the EtherMega today. 

Moppyduino - the Arduino-based FDD music player

 In response to yesterday's article about the music-playing switching valve we bring you Rupert Hirst's "Moppyduino" project. This is a device that can control six floppy disk drives in order to create some credible music. Furthermore it has been built using a custom PCB containing a bare Arduino-compatible circuit. Even if you're not interested in music the process of making a PCB at home has been included which is interesting reading in itself. In the following video you can see this process and the results of the player:

 

For more information visit Rupert's website. And for more, we're on twitter and Google+, so follow us for news and product updates as well.

 

 

If you're wanting to reproduce the project above - we've got you covered with our new ATmega328P MCUs with Arduino Uno bootloader:

This is the same Atmel AVR ATmega328P microcontroller used in the official Arduino Uno, as well as our ElevenEtherTenUSBDroid, and other boards. Perfect for building your own Arduino-compatible project directly on a breadboard or on a custom PCB, or for replacing the MCU in an existing board. Comes with the Arduino Uno bootloader pre-installed. Better still, it even has a special label stuck on top with details of the pinout, so you don't even need to look up the datasheet when connecting it up in your project! For more information and to order, click here!

Tuesday, 26 February 2013

Build a robotic fish with Arduino

And now for something completely different. Boris Landoni from Open Electronics has constructed and documented his robotic fish. With a body made from polystyrene, he modified it to have three vertical joints. Each joint contains a servo which in combination cam created the required movements to emulate a real fish. Sharp infra-red distance sensors have been added so the fish doesn't swim into objects, and the control is a simple matter of programming the Arduino compatible. The final results are successful - for example (turn volume down):

 

Add a laser to the head and it's perfect... Nevertheless, visit the project page for more details. And for more, we're on twitter and Google+, so follow us for news and product updates as well.

Want to make your own Arduino-controlled project with servos and more - but not sure how to start? Then the best way to learn is with out new Experimenter's Kit for Arduino:

The package includes a wide variety of parts, sensors and modules including: a servo motor, lights, buttons, switches, sound, sensors, breadboard, wires and more. Furthermore a Freetronics Eleven Arduino-compatible board is included to make this an extensive hobby experimenter, inventor and starter kit. However we don't leave you alone to figure it all out, included is a great project and instruction booklet, plus access to a supporting web page and software examples. In other words - this is everything you need to get started for a fun range of electronics and Arduino related projects! 

So to get started or for more information and to order, check out the product page.

Updated - Code::Blocks IDE Arduino Edition

Fans of the Code::Blocks open-source IDE or those of you looking for a more featured IDE will appreciate the updates to the latest version. Arduino integration has been included from having a project wizard that can import various libraries, run sketches through an API Arduino simulator, and also an inbuilt Arduino sketch uploader for a seamless experience. 

So if you're looking for an IDE that can be used across all platforms and devleopment boards - Code::Blocks is a worthwhile contender. And it's free - so check it out. And for more, we're on twitter and Google+, so follow us for news and product updates as well.

If you're new to Arduino, the first step is a solid board for your projects - our Freetronics Eleven - the Arduino-Uno compatible with low-profile USB socket, onboard prototyping space and easy to view LEDs:

Play the "Imperial March" on a fast switching valve

It seems that the fad of using floppy drives to make music has shifted over to industrial components - and this next example by Arduino forum member "kerimil" could be the start of a whole new method. Using an Arduino and the tone library, a Festo fast switching valve can be activated and deactivated at such a speed that the resulting sound is quite effective. It's a little crazy, but it works - (and watch the battery on the table move from the vibration) for example:

 

The code is very simple, and can be found here. And we're on twitter and Google+, so follow us for news and product updates as well.

If you're interested in working with piezos for various reasons we have a neat little SOUND: sound and buzzer module:

It can be used as a noise-maker driven by your microcontroller for audible feedback of events, and it can also be used as a knock-detector input to sense events and react to them. Includes a built-in 1M resistor to allow the piezo element to detect shocks. For more information and to order, please visit the product page here

Internet radio with an Arduino and Raspberry Pi

Each development platform has its' own strengths and weaknesses, however synergy can be found when two platforms work together for a common goal. The following example demonstrates neatly how an Arduino board and LCD can work together with a Raspberry Pi to create an Internet-radio. The RPi receives the streaming audio, plays it through an external speaker - and displays relevant data on the LCD. It's relatively simple and it works, for example:

 

Another interesting example of Raspberry Pi and Arduino working together. And for more, we're on twitter and Google+, so follow us for news and product updates as well.


Want to make your own Arduino-controlled project, but not sure how to start? Then the best way to learn is with out new Experimenter's Kit for Arduino:

The package includes a wide variety of parts, sensors and modules including: a servo motor, lights, buttons, switches, sound, sensors, breadboard, wires and more. Furthermore a Freetronics Eleven Arduino-compatible board is included to make this an extensive hobby experimenter, inventor and starter kit. However we don't leave you alone to figure it all out, included is a great project and instruction booklet, plus access to a supporting web page and software examples. In other words - this is everything you need to get started for a fun range of electronics and Arduino related projects! 

So to get started or for more information and to order, check out the product page.

DIY Valentines Day illuminated heart

Although Valentines Day is a long way ahead of us, it never hurts to start preparing early. The next project embodies that spirit - a motion-controlled LED-illuminated heart decoration that's sure to show you care. Based around a small Arduino-compatible board it uses a simple passive infra-red motion detector that triggers the Arduino to turn on the LEDs for a period of time. With a little more work it would be possible to create a variety of visual effects to impress.

 

 

To get started on your own version, visit the project page. And for more, we're on twitter and Google+, so follow us for news and product updates as well. 

If you're looking to make more creative designs with LEDs, consider the Freetronics RGBLED: full colour module. It includes a bright RGB LED on the top of the board and a WS2801 constant-current, addressable, multi-channel LED driver on the back. This smart module can be daisy-chained, so you can connect a number of these together in a string and drive each of the module colours individually from your microcontroller. For more information and to order, visit the product page.

Arduino motor control via Bluetooth

Once again Rui Santos brings us another simple yet useful Arduino tutorial. In his latest instalment he demonstrates how to control an Arduino using text commands over serial via Bluetooth. A lot of people consider this to be difficult, however with the freely-available "Blueterm" Android app you can send and receive text - which an Arduino can easily receive and act upon. For the demonstration Rui controls a DC motor with an L293D motor controller IC which is useful in itself, for example:

 

Visit Rui's website for more information and the tutorial. And we're on twitter and Google+, so follow us for news and product updates as well.

When prototyping more advanced Arduino-based projects, you'll need a protoshield to mount the external circuitry. In doing so, consider our range of ProtoShields. From the tiny LeoStick to the Mega range, we offer a complete range for you to work with.

Monday, 25 February 2013

DIY wireless remote for cable-release shutter cameras

Arduino enthusiast Andy has a camera with an older-style cable shutter release, and created a unique method of wireless remote control for the camera. By using a servo to pull and push the shutter release cable, and then controlling the servo via an Arduino-compatible circuit the mechanics of the remote were solved. And for wireless remote - a cheap RF remote control was hacked to control the Arduino. It's simple and it works - well done Andy

Click here for more information, notes and the Arduino sketch. And for more, we're on twitter and Google+, so follow us for news and product updates as well.

Want to make your own Arduino-controlled project, but not sure how to start? Then the best way to learn is with out new Experimenter's Kit for Arduino:

The package includes a wide variety of parts, sensors and modules including: a servo motor, lights, buttons, switches, sound, sensors, breadboard, wires and more. Furthermore a Freetronics Eleven Arduino-compatible board is included to make this an extensive hobby experimenter, inventor and starter kit. However we don't leave you alone to figure it all out, included is a great project and instruction booklet, plus access to a supporting web page and software examples. In other words - this is everything you need to get started for a fun range of electronics and Arduino related projects! 

So to get started or for more information and to order, check out the product page.

Measure temperature and humidity with a Raspberry Pi

Raspberry Pi enthusiast Mark Wolfe was looking for a simple method of locally measuring both temperature and humidity, and found the answer with his RPi and our HUMID: module. As the module contains all the required circuitry, Mark simply had to connect power and data lines to the board and load the appropriate software. After building the library it was successful and we look forward to Mark's exploration with the module. 

For more information and complete instructions, visit Mark's website. And we're on twitter and Google+, so follow us for news and product updates as well.

If you're looking for a sensor to measure temperature and humidity - check out our HUMID: humidity and temperature sensor module. Designed around the DHT22 sensor, it only requires one digital pin and power - and is easy to use with out Quick Start guide. With a temperature range of -4°C to +125°C with +/-0.5°C accuracy, and humidity at 0-100% with 2-5% accuracy you're ready to measure. For more information and to order, click here

DIY remote-control indoor blimp with Arduino

If you can get your hands on an indoor blimp inflated with helium, then the next step is to add a propulsion system and remote control, and an example of this has been documented by Instructables member "masynmachien". By creating large fins that are controlled by micro servos, and putting one on each side of blimp - it can "swim" through the air at a sedate pace. Plus with the servos being controlled by a bare Arduino-compatible circuit it was easy to add remote-control via infra-red. At first it sounded a little far-fetched, but it works - for example:

 

That's incredible - and you can do it to by following the instructions from here. And for more, we're on twitter and Google+, so follow us for news and product updates as well.

If you're making your own blimp or other Arduino-based project and don't want to banish an entire board - instead get yourself an ATmega328 preloaded with the Arduino bootloader:

This is the same Atmel AVR ATmega328P microcontroller used in the official Arduino Uno, as well as our ElevenEtherTenUSBDroid, and other boards. Perfect for building your own Arduino-compatible project directly on a breadboard or on a custom PCB, or for replacing the MCU in an existing board. For more information to order, click here

Thursday, 21 February 2013

Make a wireless Google Reader control with Arduino

Once again software programmer and technology enthusiast Nick Fryer has shared another useful project with us - a remote-control for a PC in order to control reading software. The system uses a Freetronics Eleven at the user's end with two large buttons for "forward" and "backwards". When the buttons are pressed a character is sent via 433 MHz wireless to a receiver with an Arduino Leonardo - which can simply emulate a USB keyboard and thus control the software for the reader. It's a great solution and makes life easier for the user.

For more information, the Arduino sketches and points of interest, visit Nick's website. And for more, we're on twitter and Google+, so follow us for news and product updates as well.

If you're making your own Arduino-based project that needs USB emulation - check out our LeoStick. It's the Arduino Leonardo-compatible board that's cheaper and smaller than the original:

 Apart from being one of the smallest Arduino-compatibles on the market with USB, it also has an onboard RGB LED and piezo which can be used a knock sensor and various tune and sound effects. Plus you can add extra circuitry with the matching protostick! For more information and to order, click here.

DIY LFS gear indicator with Arduino

Racing simulator enthusiast Andrew Huxtable has worked on many projects to enhance the experience with his simulators, and one of these is his gear-shift indicator project. Andrew has used a large single digit 7-segment LED module and mounted a Freetronics EtherTen and a darlington-transistor array circuit to drive the LEDs. There's also a shift light at the top of the display to let you know when to change gear. It works very well and adds to the experience, for example:

 

For more information, the code and other interesting projects visit Andrew's website. And for more, we're on twitter and Google+, so follow us for news and product updates as well.

If you're new to Arduino, the first step is a solid board for your projects - our Freetronics Eleven - the Arduino-Uno compatible with low-profile USB socket, onboard prototyping space and easy to view LEDs:

Build a childrens' cash register with Arduino

As an entertaining device for a child and an interesting Arduino-based project, Roman Mueller built a toy cash register that's powered by an Arduino-compatible board. It has a working numeric keypad, LCD module for displaying random numbers, a non-functioning but noisy replica of a bar-code scanner and more. The project is finished in a customised enclosure and certainly looks like fun for a young one - for example:

 

Certainly something different, but shows you can have fun with Arduino. Visit the project page for more information. And for more, we're on twitter and Google+, so follow us for news and product updates as well.

If you're making your own Arduino-based project - check out our LeoStick. It's the Arduino Leonardo-compatible board that's cheaper and smaller than the original:

 Apart from being one of the smallest Arduino-compatibles on the market with USB, it also has an onboard RGB LED and piezo which can be used a knock sensor and various tune and sound effects. Plus you can add extra circuitry with the matching protostick! For more information and to order, click here.

Wednesday, 20 February 2013

Trick potential burglars with an Arduino-powered fake TV

There is a theory that potential burglars can be tricked into thinking a home is occupied when in fact it isn't by using a fake television. This is a device that creates enough random illumination in a room to make it appear that someone's in there watching television. There are even commercial devices to do this, however if you need one - instead make your own with an Arduino. By following the instructions by Arduino forum member "modeller" you'll be fooling the thieves in no time - or at least making some interesting room lighting effects - for example: 

Once it reflects around the room, the illusion of a televsion being on in a dark room could possible be emulated. So for more information, visit the project post. And for more - we're on twitter and Google+, so follow us for news and product updates as well.

If you're looking to make your own RGB LED projects, consider the Freetronics RGBLED: full colour module. It includes a bright RGB LED on the top of the board and a WS2801 constant-current, addressable, multi-channel LED driver on the back. This smart module can be daisy-chained, so you can connect a number of these together in a string and drive each of the module colours individually from your microcontroller. For more information and to order, visit the product page.

Make an Arduino-powered wrist watch

Although the market contains a plethora of programmable and connected watches, it's still fun to make your own. An interesting example of this is by Instructables user "kenyer" who used a small Arduino-compatible board, a Nokia LCD module and miscellaneous hardware to fashion his own watch. With only two buttons, it still has many features including time in digital and analogue display, stopwatch, backlight control and more. All the designs and code are supplied so you can replicate it yourself, for example:

Once again kudos to Kenyer for an interesting project. And for more, we're on twitter and Google+, so follow us for news and product updates as well.

If you're making your own miniature Arduino-based project - check out our LeoStick. It's the Arduino Leonardo-compatible board that's cheaper and smaller than the original:

 Apart from being one of the smallest Arduino-compatibles on the market with USB, it also has an onboard RGB LED and piezo which can be used a knock sensor and various tune and sound effects. Plus you can add extra circuitry with the matching protostick! For more information and to order, click here.

Articulate your love for another with Arduino

Electronics enthusiast and Instructables member "LGConcepts" found some synergy between Arduino and Valentine Day with this unique project. With some plexiglass, basic hardware, Arduino and LEDs he created a sign with a romantic message that can be selectively illuminated with the LEDs shining through the plexiglass. The light shines through the vertical sign and is refracted by the cut-away letters of the message which are then illuminated, for example:

 

It's never too early to start, so click here to get moving! And for more, we're on twitter and Google+, so follow us for news and product updates as well.

If Arduino is new to you, but you're not sure how to to start with it - then the best way to learn is with out new Experimenter's Kit for Arduino:

The package includes a wide variety of parts, sensors and modules including: a servo motor, lights, buttons, switches, sound, sensors, breadboard, wires and more. Furthermore a Freetronics Eleven Arduino-compatible board is included to make this an extensive hobby experimenter, inventor and starter kit. However we don't leave you alone to figure it all out, included is a great project and instruction booklet, plus access to a supporting web page and software examples. In other words - this is everything you need to get started for a fun range of electronics and Arduino related projects! 

So to get started or for more information and to order, check out the product page.

Monday, 18 February 2013

Build your own Rocket Launch Controller

Model rocketry and doomsday-machine fans alike will find this project useful or at least a lot of fun. The folks at the Arduining site have created a full-featured countdown timer device that can trigger a relay or other digital output at the end of the countdown. However it looks the part as well as being functional - with a two-stage trigger system, digital countdown timer and ominous beeping it plays the part very well. It isn't complex and can be recreated with an Arduino-compatible board and a few parts. The following video contains a demonstration countdown sequence:

 

That would make a lot of fun for children and adults alike, so click here to get started. And for more, we're on twitter and Google+, so follow us for news and product updates as well.

If you're new to Arduino, the first step is a solid board for your projects - our Freetronics Eleven - the Arduino-Uno compatible with low-profile USB socket, onboard prototyping space and easy to view LEDs:

Control an Arduino with Android via Bluetooth

If you have an Android phone and an inexpensive Bluetooth adaptor, it's easy to create your own Android applications to control the Arduino and the objects connected to it. It isn't complex at all - as you can create the Android application using the free MIT App Inventor software. Then simple serial commands can be sent from the phone, interpreted by your Arduino and your control needs fulfilled. For example:

 

Very well done - for instructions visit the project page. And for more, we're on twitter and Google+, so follow us for news and product updates as well.

If you're looking for an Arduino-compatible board with inbuilt USB host shield for more direct Android development, look no further as we have the Freetronics USBDroid board:

Apart from being a fully Arduino Uno-compatible, it has onboard microSD socket and the full USB socket and host-mode controller. As well as the Bluetooth application described above, this is the ideal platform for developing peripherals or projects based around Android devices with ADK (Android Developer Kit) functionality, but without requiring a USB host controller shield stacked onto an Arduino. For more information and to order, visit the product page here

Requesting an elevator via email

Some Brazilian enthusiasts have hacked an ancient lift/elevator system with one goal in mind - the ability to send an email to call the lift to their level. Some of us thought the simply fitted an optocoupler and Arduino-related hardware to the local call button, however the hackers instead fitted an Arduino-controlled relay to the required contact in the lift control system. Furthermore the system can detect when the lift is at the required level and email the notification. Then the passenger can mozy on over to the car and start their ride. More in the following video:

 

Fascinating - click here for the project page. And for more, we're on twitter and Google+, so follow us for news and product updates as well.

If Arduino is new to you, but you're not sure how to to start with it - then the best way to learn is with out new Experimenter's Kit for Arduino:

The package includes a wide variety of parts, sensors and modules including: a servo motor, lights, buttons, switches, sound, sensors, breadboard, wires and more. Furthermore a Freetronics Eleven Arduino-compatible board is included to make this an extensive hobby experimenter, inventor and starter kit. However we don't leave you alone to figure it all out, included is a great project and instruction booklet, plus access to a supporting web page and software examples. In other words - this is everything you need to get started for a fun range of electronics and Arduino related projects! 

So to get started or for more information and to order, check out the product page.

February 18, 2013

The "Garduino" garden automation system with Arduino

 In a quest for smarter garden automation and a successful vegetable garden, Edward Austin has created a fully-automated garden sprinkler control and monitoring system. It uses a wide variety of technologies - that all work well together. Soil moisture data from the garden is sent back to a main Arduino controller which can control water flow, and also send various forms of data including temperature, soil moisture levels and system status to the cloud-based cosm service via the Electric Imp. This allows monitoring from almost any Internet-connected device.  Edward's system is an example of what's possible with some planning and the right parts - and demonstrated in the following video:

 

For more information visit the project website. And for more, we're on twitter and Google+, so follow us for news and product updates as well.

To simplify relay control, Edward used our RELAY8: Arduino shield that allows you to drive up to 8 relays from your Arduino using just 2 I/O pins with this shield. It communicates with your board using I2C, so you can even stack several shields together to drive 16, 24, or more outputs! Includes back-EMF protection and works with a wide range of relays. Perfect for home automation projects! For more information and to order, click here

February 18, 2013

Distributed cache RAM for Ardusat nodes

 Enthusiast Philip Stevens has recently published his efforts on modifying a cache RAM system used with Arduino boards to work with a range of Ardusat Arduino-compatible client nodes. Doing this allows each client to access a unique 32 kByte of XRAM as well as their own 2 kByte of internal SRAM. If the whole thing seems a little "over your head", don't worry as it's all explained in great detail. 

It's a fascinating example of how Arduino boards can communicate with each other, and shows what's happening inside the ArduSat. So for more information visit Philip's interestingproject website

 Have you heard about ArduSat? It's the first open-platform low Earth orbit satellite system that allows any member of the public to design and run their own space-based applications. The project was originally funded by KickStarter donors and is now progressing very well. Participants can create their own Arduino sketches to run inside the satellite, taking advantage of the on-board sensors to record results and generate data. The hardware contains the equivalent of sixteen Arduinos which can run up to around 12 sketches concurrently. Freetronics co-founder Jonathan Oxer gives us more details in the following video:

 

We're really proud to be part of the ArduSat vision of allowing anyone to run their own experiments in space, so as well as being the payload hardware partner - we also have ArduSat prototyping modules for sale that allow you to recreate your own hardware for testing before uploading the sketch to the ArduSat system, or for your own projects. For more information about the ArduSat, visittheir website

February 18, 2013

DIY 3D Laser Spirograph with Arduino

 At the WTH blog they've demonstrated a fun project that creates some amazing lighting effects with a range of inexpensive parts. It's a laser spirograph - that consists of three enclosed cooling fans (similar to those found in PC power supplies) that each have a small mirror on one of their blades. The fans are mounted in a way that when a low-power laser is pointed inside the beam can reflect via all three mirrors as the fans rotate. With the Arduino controlling the fan speed via PWM - the effects are fascinating - for example:

 

Fantastic. If you make your own version, be careful not to point the laser at anyone eye! Click here for the project page. And for more, we're on twitter and Google+, so follow us for news and product updates as well.

If Arduino is new to you, but you're not sure how to to start with it - then the best way to learn is with out new Experimenter's Kit for Arduino:

The package includes a wide variety of parts, sensors and modules including: a servo motor, lights, buttons, switches, sound, sensors, breadboard, wires and more. Furthermore a Freetronics Eleven Arduino-compatible board is included to make this an extensive hobby experimenter, inventor and starter kit. However we don't leave you alone to figure it all out, included is a great project and instruction booklet, plus access to a supporting web page and software examples. In other words - this is everything you need to get started for a fun range of electronics and Arduino related projects! 

So to get started or for more information and to order, check out the product page.

February 14, 2013

Make a garage door-opener with Arduino and an iPhone

If you're looking for a way of remotely-controlling an Arduino via your iPhone, but don't want to write the HTML for the interface... then this may be an option for you. The team from Red Frog Software have published an Instructable that details how to interface an electric garage door system with an Ethernet-enabled Arduino board. This setup can then be controlled over the Internet using their iPhone app. If you're in a hurry, it's simple and it works.

To get started on your own version, click here. And for more, we're on twitter and Google+, so follow us for news and product updates as well.

To get started with your own Internet-enabled projects, use our Freetronics EtherTen - theArduino Uno-compatible with onboard Ethernet, microSD socket and optional PoE:

... or for more program space, I/O ports consider the Freetronics EtherMega - the Arduino Mega2560-compatible with onboard Ethernet, microSD socket and optional PoE:

February 14, 2013

The simple oscilloscope with Arduino

 Once again engineering student Rui Santos has published an interesting Arduino tutorial, which covers building a very simple oscilloscope. We realise that this won't give you the most accurate piece of test equipment - however it's a fun way to learn about Arduino and especially analogue inputs, as well as working with processing on a PC. Great for beginners, cheaply monitoring analogue sensor outputs or showing off to someone that you're encouraging into the world of electronics. Check out Rui's demonstration video below:

 

Well done! To recreate your own, visit the project page. And for more, we're on twitter and Google+, so follow us for news and product updates as well.

If you're new to Arduino, the first step is a solid board for your projects - our Freetronics Eleven - the Arduino-Uno compatible with low-profile USB socket, onboard prototyping space and easy to view LEDs:


February 14, 2013

Tutorial: Control devices over the Internet with Arduino

 Controlling devices over the Internet is certainly possible, and there are an almost infinite number of methods to make it happen. One simple yet effective method is using Ethernet-enabled Arduino boards and various data protocols. Once example of this has been published by Instructables user "akellyirl". Their tutorial describes how to control Arduino digital outputs over the Internet via UDP (user datagram protocol). After reviewing this you should be up to speed on Arduino and Internet-control in no time. Furthermore, a short demonstration follows in this video:

 

To get started, visit the tutorial page. And for more, we're on twitter and Google+, so follow us for news and product updates as well.

To get started with your own Internet-enabled projects, use our Freetronics EtherTen - theArduino Uno-compatible with onboard Ethernet, microSD socket and optional PoE:

... or for more program space, I/O ports consider the Freetronics EtherMega - the Arduino Mega2560-compatible with onboard Ethernet, microSD socket and optional PoE: