Thursday, 29 November 2012

Convert a toy piano into a MIDI keyboard

Using an Arduino board, a protoshieldshift register and a few hours tinkering, Jen Shen turned an aged Casio SA-47 piano into a MIDI keyboard that actually works. By determining how the keyboard is wired, Jen connects the matrix to the shift register and reads the keyboard using the parallel-out shift register technique. Then the Arduino can convert the signals into MIDI data and send it off to the outside world. Here's a quick video of the keyboard in action:

 

That's a fine example of hardware hacking and making something more useful from a toy. For complete instructions visit the project pageAnd for more, we're on twitter and Google+, so follow us for news and product updates as well.


 

When creating projects with external circuitry hacking existing devices - consider our range of ProtoShields. From the tiny LeoStick to the Mega range, we offer a complete range for you to work with

Make your own line-following robot with Arduino

Robotics is always a fun topic, and the following project is a good example of this. By using two constant-rotating servos, three infra-red sensors and an ultrasonic sensor, the robot's Arduino board can control and drive the robot to follow the line plus be aware of any obstacles it may face. Making this may seem like a simple project, but it's a good foundation for greater things. For inspiration here is the robot in action:


For complete instructions and notes, visit the project pageAnd for more, we're on twitter and Google+, so follow us for news and product updates as well.
 

If this type of project interests you and you're new to the Arduino world, check out our new Experimenter's Kit for Arduino:

The package includes a wide variety of parts, sensors and modules including: a servo motor, lights, buttons, switches, sound, sensors, breadboard, wires and more. Furthermore a Freetronics Eleven Arduino-compatible board is included to make this an extensive hobby experimenter, inventor and starter kit. However we don't leave you alone to figure it all out, included is a great project and instruction booklet, plus access to a supporting web page and software examples. In other words - this is everything you need to get started for a fun range of electronics and Arduino related projects! 

So to get started or for more information and to order, check out the product page.

MariaMole - a new IDE for Arduino

To satisfy the desire to write their own IDE, and also improve on the Arduino-supplied version, enthusiast Alex went ahead and created his own - MariaMole. It has several new features and improvements over the original, such as multiple serial monitors, allowing multiple sketches to be open in one window, different colour schemes, and the ability to easily import existing sketches and libraries. And it looks pretty snazzy, for example:

Finally Alex has made the project open source, so everyone is free to download and improve on the IDE. So click here to get started, and for more, we're on twitter and Google+, so follow us for news and product updates as well.

If you're new to Arduino, the first step is a solid board for your projects - our Freetronics Eleven - the Arduino-Uno compatible with low-profile USB socket, onboard prototyping space and easy to view LEDs:

Wednesday, 28 November 2012

Control twenty servos from one Arduino

Not content with their previous efforts, the people at rcarduino blog have demonstrated a method of controlling twenty servos using only four Arduino digital pins, the two timer registers and some 4017 logic ICs. These decade-counter ICs allow for throwing signals to each of the ten servos in sequence very quickly. However they have created a serial servo library to make coding simpler, and the whole project is very much convenient. Just the thing for making your own motorised creatures with ten legs, or a huge analogue display board.

For more information, click here for demonstration code and the Arduino library. And for more, we're on twitter and Google+, so follow us for news and product updates as well.

When creating projects with external circuitry or ten servos - consider our range of ProtoShields. From the tiny LeoStick to the Mega range, we offer a complete range for you to work with

More SMS messaging with Arduino and old Motorola handsets

A lot of inexpensive and aged Motorola GSM handsets might not be the latest thing, however they have one very useful characteristic - their ease of interfacing with an Arduino. You can connect the serial TX/RX lines straight into the phone using a hacked headset cable and control them with normal AT commands. This has been demonstrated once more by Matthew Sheffield with a Motorola c168i. He demonstrates the required wiring and Arduino sketch to send an SMS on demand, for example:

 

You can also use Motorola C261s for this type of project as well, so keep an eye on eBay or the discount stores for a cheap Arduino-SMS gateway. For the details - click here. And for more, we're on twitter and Google+, so follow us for news and product updates as well.

If you find this type of project interesting, get yourself a copy of "Practical Arduino" by Jonathan Oxer and Hugh Blemings:

 

Create your own Arduino-based designs, gain an in-depth knowledge of the architecture of Arduino, and learn the easy-to-use Arduino language all in the context of practical projects that you can build yourself at home. Get hands-on experience using a variety of projects and recipes for everything from home automation to test equipment. For more information and to order, click here

Tuesday, 27 November 2012

The Arduino-powered Spatialised Umbrella

November 28, 2012

The Arduino-powered Spatialised Umbrella

 Using a simple umbrella, Joe Saavedra has created an device that uses "light and sound spatialization this umbrella creates an immersive, mobile, and highly personal multi‐sensory environment.  Range sensing technology helps the Spatialized Umbrella react to your movement through a space". In other words, as someone gets closer to the umbrella (with the distance being measured by an infrared distance sensor), sound loops are played through five speakers around the umbrella, and LEDs generate a visual display. Here's an example of the umbrella in action:

Certainly something different or perhaps a form of modern art? You decide. And for more, we're on twitter and Google+, so follow us for news and product updates as well.

If this type of project interests you and you're new to the Arduino world, check out our new Experimenter's Kit for Arduino:

The package includes a wide variety of parts, sensors and modules including: a servo motor, lights, buttons, switches, sound, sensors, breadboard, wires and more. Furthermore a Freetronics Eleven Arduino-compatible board is included to make this an extensive hobby experimenter, inventor and starter kit. However we don't leave you alone to figure it all out, included is a great project and instruction booklet, plus access to a supporting web page and software examples. In other words - this is everything you need to get started for a fun range of electronics and Arduino related projects! 

So to get started or for more information and to order, check out the product page.

Solving household pet dilemmas with Arduino

Arduino forum member 'teckel' has a few dogs at home, however they have a habit of doing their "business" indoors instead of out. In an attempt to combat this behaviour, teckel has used an Arduino-controlled ultrasonic distance sensor to detect their presence in the area that will sound a piezo siren when the dogs enter the forbidden zone. It's an interesting ... solution to the problem, or at least a blueprint for a new type of distance alarm. 

For more details and discussion related to this project, head over to the Arduino forum. And for more, we're on twitter and Google+, so follow us for news and product updates as well.

 

If you're interested in working with piezos for various reasons we have a neat littleSOUND: sound and buzzer module:

It can be used as a noise-maker driven by your microcontroller for audible feedback of events, and it can also be used as a knock-detector input to sense events and react to them. Includes a built-in 1M resistor to allow the piezo element to detect shocks. For more information and to order, please visit the product page here

Bitlash Commander - web interface toolkit for Arduino

It seems like new web-control interfaces for Arduino boards are appearing every week now, so here's another one called "Bitlash Commander". It's a node.js web interface toolkit for Arduino, that allows control of digital outputs and pulse-width modulation using onscreen buttons and slider controls - with communication to the board via the local USB-serial cable. This would be a good setup to test external hardware connected to digital outputs without having to customise or write a test sketch - so perhaps an interesting time saver. The following is an example of the web interface:

For more information and downloads, visit the project's github page. And for more, we're on twitter and Google+, so follow us for news and product updates as well.

 

If you're new to Arduino, the first step is a solid board for your projects - our Freetronics Eleven - the Arduino-Uno compatible with low-profile USB socket, onboard prototyping space and easy to view LEDs:

Monday, 26 November 2012

Control Arduino digital I/O via an iDevice

Another example of controlling an Arduino's digital I/O pins has recently appeared - the "iArduino" application for Apple iPod, iPhone and iPad devices. It is a two-part procedure, you need the software on your Apple device and also the matching sketch uploaded onto your Arduino+Ethernet shield combination board (or EtherTen). You add the IP address for your Arduino in the sketch, then enter this and the port number into the iDevice and away you go. Here's a long video running through the process:

 

So if this is of interest to you, click here for more information and the software links. And for more, we're on twitter and Google+, so follow us for news and product updates as well.

 

When putting together your next Internet-enabled Arduino project - save time, space and money with the Freetronics EtherTen. Apart from being fully Arduino Uno-compatible, it has onboard Ethernet, microSD socket, full USB interface (so you don't need a costly FTDI cable just to upload a sketch!) and supports optional Power-over-Ethernet.

Sunday, 25 November 2012

DIY Facebook notifier with Arduino

For a first-time project this is pretty impressive - Arduino forum member Apolikamixitos has published details of his open-source Facebook status notifier. It will alert you to new messages, notifications or friend requests using Facebook PHP code and Tinkerproxy. Although it uses LEDs for notification, you could easily create motorised devices, sound effects or other devices to get your attention. In the following video you can see a full run-down of operation:

 

And you don't need an Ethernet shield as it all works through USB, so click here to find out more. And for more, we're on twitter and Google+, so follow us for news and product updates as well.

 

If you're looking to make your own notifier, consider our Freetronics RGBLED: full colour module. It includes a bright RGB LED on the top of the board and a WS2801 constant-current, addressable, multi-channel LED driver on the back. This smart module can be daisy-chained, so you can connect a number of these together in a string and drive each of the module colours individually from your microcontroller. For more information and to order, visit the product page.

Arduino LCD game: Defuse

Once more Emmanuel Turner has ported another game to work with an Arduino and our LCD Keypad Shield. In this instalment he brings us the classic game "Defuse". In this game you travel around an imaginary area of 100 levels with 100 zones in each level. Armed with only a bomb detectors and twenty attempts, you have to move around the area to find and defuse the bomb. It's a lot of fun and reminds me of programming it in BASIC all those years ago. Here it is in action:


To get started, click here for Emmanuel's project page. And for more, we're on twitter and Google+, so follow us for news and product updates as well.

Instead of building your own LCD module onto a breadboard, save time and move forward with the Freetronics LCD & Keypad shield which contains a bright 16x2 character LCD and five buttons that can be read from only one analog input pin:

Program Arduino via Visual Studio

 If you find the Microsoft Visual Studio development environment comfortable, you now have another way to program your Arduino boards. The "Visual Micro" plug-in for Visual Studio is now available and claims to provide 100% compatibility with Arduino IDE versions 0023 through to 1.0.2. Visually (!) it's an appealing IDE and also allows for some debugging - with a beta update you can alter Arduino variables  during operation. Interesting.

So if you enjoy Microsoft IDEs click here to get started. And for more, we're on twitter and Google+, so follow us for news and product updates as well. 

If you're new to Arduino, the first step is a solid board for your projects - our Freetronics Eleven - the Arduino-Uno compatible with low-profile USB socket, onboard prototyping space and easy to view LEDs:

Thursday, 22 November 2012

DIY Illutron-B Music Synthesiser with Arduino

Once again Duane B from the rcarduino blog has shared another audio project based around an Arduino. In this example he builds upon the concept of the Illutron Synthesiser - a device which can generate a wide variety of sounds (and perhaps music) using direct digital synthesis. Construction is very easy, and only requires a few dollars worth of parts apart from the board itself - and the results are very good:

 

For more information and the instructions, click hereAnd for more, we're on twitter and Google+, so follow us for news and product updates as well. 

 

If this type of project interests you and you're new to the Arduino world, check out our new Experimenter's Kit for Arduino:

The package includes a wide variety of parts, sensors and modules including: a servo motor, lights, buttons, switches, sound, sensors, breadboard, wires and more. Furthermore a Freetronics Eleven Arduino-compatible board is included to make this an extensive hobby experimenter, inventor and starter kit. However we don't leave you alone to figure it all out, included is a great project and instruction booklet, plus access to a supporting web page and software examples. In other words - this is everything you need to get started for a fun range of electronics and Arduino related projects! 

So to get started or for more information and to order, check out the product page.

DIY Arduino-controlled Nixie tube clock

Nixie tubes - the displays from the previous century. Although they can be considered as hopelessly out of date, and somewhat tricky to drive - they're having a resurgence in popularity especially with the DIY crowd. One example of this is by Australian Arduino forum member 'randyrob' who has used ex-Soviet IN-12 numeric tubes and an Arduino-compatible to create a clock from the past. The clock is operational however the housing is a work-in-progress - for example:

However building such a clock is rewarding, and it's nice to watch the digits glow - soclick here for complete details and notes. And for more, we're on twitter and Google+, so follow us for news and product updates as well.

 

When making your own clock - don't skimp on timing accuracy - so consider using our real-time clock module based on the DS3232 - with a temperature-controlled oscillator it is highly accurate, and has an onboard backup battery for when the power dies and 236 bytes of non-volatile memory for user data.

Easily control RGB LEDs via Android

Controlling Arduino-connected devices via Android is certainly possible however not for the absolute beginner (though don't let that stop you!). In some cases you may just want a specific task - such as controlling a light. In this example you can use a free or paid Android app to control a Bluetooth-equipped Arduino board - which then controls individual red, green and blue LEDs for various lighting effects. The code is available under a GPL3 open-source licence, and the results are very good - for example:

 

Getting started is very easy, so click here to check it out. And for more, we're on twitter and Google+, so follow us for news and product updates as well.

If you're looking to make more creative designs with LEDs, consider the Freetronics RGBLED: full colour module. It includes a bright RGB LED on the top of the board and a WS2801 constant-current, addressable, multi-channel LED driver on the back. This smart module can be daisy-chained, so you can connect a number of these together in a string and drive each of the module colours individually from your microcontroller. For more information and to order, visit the product page.

Wednesday, 21 November 2012

Make your own electronic dice

Whether you want to make an electronic die, or a pair of electronic dice - the tutorial by Instructables user ".A." will give you a head-start on the project. It's a time-honoured classic Arduino project, and also a great one to share with beginners to show them how simple our technology can be. The project is constructed on an solderless breadboard an would take less than an hour to complete. Here is an example of the project in action:

 

So for more information and the tutorial, click here. And we're on twitter, so follow us for news and product updates as well.

 

If this type of project interests you and you're new to the Arduino world, check out our new Experimenter's Kit for Arduino:

The package includes a wide variety of parts, sensors and modules including: a servo motor, lights, buttons, switches, sound, sensors, breadboard, wires and more. Furthermore a Freetronics Eleven Arduino-compatible board is included to make this an extensive hobby experimenter, inventor and starter kit. However we don't leave you alone to figure it all out, included is a great project and instruction booklet, plus access to a supporting web page and software examples. In other words - this is everything you need to get started for a fun range of electronics and Arduino related projects! 

So to get started or for more information and to order, check out the product page.

Tuesday, 20 November 2012

Make your own geolocation data logger with Arduino

The ability to measure various forms of data and log it for further analysis is one of the strong points of the Arduino platform, as doing so is relatively simple. One example of this is the Geo Data Logger by Instructables user techbitar. They have demonstrated how to log GPS position data, time, speed, and accelerometer data to a microSD card in a well-documented project. Futhermore each stage of the Arduino sketch is explained well, so he reader has a better understanding of operation, instead of just "uploading and doing". 

To get moving with your own version, visit the project page. And we're on twitter, so follow us for news and product updates as well.

 

For those looking to recreate such a project, a good start would be our Eleven board along with the AM3X accelerometer module:

This tiny 3-axis accelerometer module can operate in either +/-1.5g or +/-6g ranges, giving your project the ability to tell which way is up. Ideal for robotics projects, tilt sensors, vehicle dataloggers, and whatever else you can dream up. For more infomation and to order, click here

 

 

DIY Simple Arduino-based Trumpet

Well... not a real trumpet of course, but an electronic version that still has the three buttons and emits the noise through a small speaker. By following Instructables' user "QuicksilverRox's" guide the goal of a simple electronic music device can be met. It only requires an Arduino-compatible board, a piezo speaker and some simple button circuitry. This would be a great project to introduce someone to the world of Arduino or just make some noise.

For more information and to make your own version, click here. And for more, we're on twitter and Google+, so follow us for news and product updates as well.

When creating projects with external circuitry to work with an  project - consider our range of ProtoShields. From the tiny LeoStick to the Mega range, we offer a complete range for you to work with

 

Monday, 19 November 2012

Controlling AC motors with an Arduino

As part of a long-term project to hack an electric sewing machine, Barbara "PC-Monster" W has been experimenting with an optotriac to allow isolated control of the mains current to the motor via a microcontroller, in this case an Arduino. An optotriac is similar to an optocoupler except it can handle mains-rated voltages - so if using one take care and have qualified people with you.  

Moving forward Barbara hopes to detect the position of the sewing needle, motor speed and control the speed for some Arduino-controlled automation, so to keep track visit her blog here. And for more, we're on twitter and Google+, so follow us for news and product updates as well.

If you're interested in switching high-current loads from an Arduino or other development platform, check out our NDRIVE: N-MOSFET driver output module:

 

 
This high-power N-MOSFET module lets you switch high-current loads using a tiny microcontroller. Perfect for controlling that set of traffic lights mounted in your living room! Works brilliantly for automotive projects such as switching high-power 12V lights and high wattage LEDs. It can be driven directly from a 5V logic output, and handles up to 60V at 20A. For more information and to order, click here

Low-power Arduino demonstration with wake system

Arduino enthusiast Nick Gammon has demonstrated a method of running an Arduino microcontroller using an incredibly small amount of current - down to 0.1 uA. This is achieve by constructing an absolute bare-minimum system consisting of the ATmega328 and enough components to allow for function - so no voltage regulators, USB interface or other miscellaneous circuitry. Furthermore, by using a typical numeric keypad Nick introduces a wake-on-press function that also returns the buttons pressed to the Arduino. 

This is a great example of a project that requires user-input and long battery life, or even for interest's sake. To get started, visit Nick's project page here. And for more, we're on twitter and Google+, so follow us for news and product updates as well.

If you're prototyping Arduino projects on solderless breadboards, blown the MCU on your board, or making your own - save time and hassle with our new ATmega328 microcontroller pre-loaded with the Arduino Uno bootloader:

It's the same one as found on our Eleven, KitTen and the original Arduino Uno, plus it has a very useful pinout sticker attached to save confusion when wiring it up. So for more information and to order, click here. And we also sell the stickers!

Automatically leveling your "Castlevania" character with Arduino

Nuno Alves had the typical dilemma of needing to take care of his young child and wanting to play Castlevania at the same time. Instead of being a bad parent or ignoring the game, Nuno turned to an Arduino to solve the problem. He has created a device which physically presses the attack button on a PS3 controller repeatedly. This helps increase the score as once one positions the game character at a certain spot on the screen, it can easily stand and attack oncoming zombies for a simple points earn. All is revealed in the following video:

 

Furthermore the Arduino sketch and notes are contained in the project page. Well done Nuno. And for more, we're on twitter and Google+, so follow us for news and product updates as well.

 

If this type of project interests you and you're new to the Arduino world, check out our new Experimenter's Kit for Arduino:

The package includes a wide variety of parts, sensors and modules including: a servo motor, lights, buttons, switches, sound, sensors, breadboard, wires and more. Furthermore a Freetronics Eleven Arduino-compatible board is included to make this an extensive hobby experimenter, inventor and starter kit. However we don't leave you alone to figure it all out, included is a great project and instruction booklet, plus access to a supporting web page and software examples. In other words - this is everything you need to get started for a fun range of electronics and Arduino related projects! 

So to get started or for more information and to order, check out the product page.

Sunday, 18 November 2012

Making Android apps and working with Arduino

Android developer and all-round technologist AdamOutler has published a series of video tutorials on creating Android apps, and also integration with the hardware via the Android ADK. Starting from basically blinking an LED he takes you through a variety of topics to the point of home automation and other useful system ideas. The videos are well presented and make interesting viewing, for example:

 

For more information and the complete series, click here. And for more, we're on twitter and Google+, so follow us for news and product updates as well.

 

If you're looking for an Arduino-compatible board with inbuilt USB host shield for ADK experimenting look no further as we have the Freetronics USBDroid board:

Apart from being a fully Arduino Uno-compatible, it has onboard microSD socket and the full USB socket and host-mode controller. As well as the Bluetooth application described above, this is the ideal platform for developing peripherals or projects based around Android devices with ADK (Android Developer Kit) functionality, but without requiring a USB host controller shield stacked onto an Arduino. For more information and to order, visit the product page here

Arduino LCD game: Nicomachus

Once more Emmanuel Turner has ported another game to work with an Arduino and our LCD Keypad Shield. In this instalment he brings us the classic game "Nicomachus". It's very good - you think of a number, then answer three questions from the Arduino - and it guesses your number. It's a classic that dates back to 90AD and adapted from the classic book of games by David Ahl. Review the video for a demonstration:

 

Once again - well done Emmanuel. For more information including the sketch and other interesting Arduino projects, visit Emmanuel's siteAnd for more, we're on twitter and Google+, so follow us for news and product updates as well.

Instead of building your own LCD module onto a breadboard, save time and move forward with the Freetronics LCD & Keypad shield which contains a bright 16x2 character LCD and five buttons that can be read from only one analog input pin:

DIY hardware ZABBIX agent with Arduino

The first thing that came to mind when researching this was "what's Zabbix?" - and in answer to that - "Zabbix is an enterprise-class open source distributed monitoring solution for networks and applications". Basically it allows you to monitor data from devices over the Internet. And thus Arduino forum member 'levkov' has published details of his own Zabbix agent built around an Arduino Mega with an Ethernet shield and temperature-humidity sensor. The hardware assembly is incredibly simple, and they've also published the required Arduino sketch and example to get you going. Below is an example of the output from the service:

So once again we have a great example of Internet-connected devices and Arduino. Click here to get started with your own version, and for more, we're on twitter and Google+, so follow us for news and product updates as well.

In his project levkov used a separate Arduino Mega and Ethernet shield, however you can save time, money, space and energy instead by using the Freetronics EtherMega:

Quite simple the EtherMega is the fully-loaded Arduino-compatible board on the market today. Apart from being completely Arduino Mega2560-compatible, it includes full Ethernet interface, a microSD card socket, full USB interface, optional Power-over-Ethernet support and still has a circuit prototyping area with extra I2C interface pins. So if your project is breaking the limits, upgrade to the EtherMega today. 

Thursday, 15 November 2012

DIY Laser-pointer control with Arduino

An Arduino board can easily interface a wide variety of items, and one example of this is by allowing control of a laser beam via a Nintendo WiiChuck. Enthusiast Maks Surguy has mounted a laser pointer on a pan/tilt bracket that contains two servos, allowing for an almost-hemispherical range. Then the Arduino reads the position data from the WiiChuck and translates this into commands for the service, thus mimicking the controller with the laser - plus allowing control of power to the beam, as shown in the following video:

 

That looks like a lot of fun, so for more information click here to get started. And for more, we're on twitter and Google+, so follow us for news and product updates as well.

Arduino? Servos? And how to use them together? All this and more is explained in detail as part of our new  Experimenter's Kit for Arduino:

The package includes a wide variety of parts, sensors and modules including: a servo motor, lights, buttons, switches, sound, sensors, breadboard, wires and more. Furthermore a Freetronics Eleven Arduino-compatible board is included to make this an extensive hobby experimenter, inventor and starter kit. However we don't leave you alone to figure it all out, included is a great project and instruction booklet, plus access to a supporting web page and software examples. In other words - this is everything you need to get started for a fun range of electronics and Arduino related projects! 

So to get started or for more information and to order, check out the product page.

The Arduino-powered Luxcity UV Tonic Control System II

Last month we reported on the The Arduino-powered Luxcity UV Tonic Control System created for a "Festival of Transitional Architecture" in Christchurch, New Zealand, as it used a maximum number of our RELAY8: shields. Well now the event has passed and their system was a complete success, it controlled 64 solenoids that control a mixture of UV tonic and air into a manifold of pipes to be pumped around a structure, with some outstanding effects - for example:


And now that the project has been completed the complete design story, Arduino sketches and more have been published for review. It's one amazing installation and you can find out more by clicking here. And for more, we're on twitter and Google+, so follow us for news and product updates as well.

 

So what is the RELAY8:? It's a new Arduino shield that allows you to drive up to 8 relays from your Arduino using just 2 I/O pins with this shield. It communicates with your board using I2C, so you can even stack several shields together to drive 16, 24, or more outputs! Includes back-EMF protection and works with a wide range of relays. Perfect for home automation projects! For more information and to order, click here

Tuesday, 13 November 2012

Monitoring electricity meter usage over MQTT with Arduino

Freetronics reseller Hadley Rich from nicegear has published an effective way of measuring household power consumption using a Freetronics EtherTen board, MQTT and some external hardware. Hadley's power meters each have an LED that blinks 1600 times per kWh used, which is just perfect for monitoring. Using a photocell taped (and covered!) to the front of the meter it can detect the pulses, which are then fed to the EtherTen via a simple circuit. The data is then published to the network using the MQTT protocol for other devices to read. 

In this case a python server receives the data over the network and logs it for graphing. An interesting and simple solution to what can often though to be a complex problem, so for more information visit the project page. And for more, we're on twitter and Google+, so follow us for news and product updates as well. 

 

When putting together your next Internet-enabled Arduino project - save time, space and money with the Freetronics EtherTen. Apart from being fully Arduino Uno-compatible, it has onboard Ethernet, microSD socket, full USB interface (so you don't need a costly FTDI cable just to upload a sketch!) and supports optional Power-over-Ethernet. For more information and to order, click here