Sunday, 30 September 2012

Quantitative Two-Dimensional Temperature Measurements with Arduino

For research purposes, "Dr Ayars" and some students came up with a huge two-dimensional temperature measuring device. Using a 30cm sqare piece of aluminium they mounted one hundred DS18B20 temperature sensors - all of which can be read by an Arduino. Once the measurements have taken place, the data can be sent out to a PC to be analysed by all sorts of software. Their example using python code created a usable colour temperature display. A fine example is shown below, where a bag of ice and a soldering iron are placed near the sensors:

For more information and to create your own version, click here. And for more, we're on twitter and Google+, so follow us for news and product updates as well.

Although measuring temperature and humidity is nothing new, have you done so with an Infrared temperature sensor module?

The new Freetronics IRTEMP: module is perfect for contactless temperature measurement. This is our special version of the industrial infrared remote thermometer units with an onboard power supply, communication support and a software library and examples supplied. Very simple to use with an Arduino as we have provided a Getting Started guide and Arduino library. For more information and to order, click here

Hardware-based random number generator seed for Arduino

The quest for a truly random number follows an almost infinite number of paths, depending on the project budget or imagination of the creator. Another interesting method has been devised over at the 1474orchard site which promises interesting results. By using a 555 oscillator circuit cranked up to around 128 kHz and the output measured by an analogue input, the readings were samples and graphed for analysis. 

The results appeared similar to the waveform of the oscillator output, however after some statistical calculations on the bit values of the samples. it was shown that the distribution of bits 0 to 4 was quite even - and once isolated could be a good source for a random number. For information, detailed explanations and more visit the sitehere. And for more, we're on twitter and Google+, so follow us for news and product updates as well.

So if this sort of project intrigues you and you're new to Arduino, the first step is a solid board for your projects - our Freetronics Eleven - the Arduino-Uno compatible with low-profile USB socket, onboard prototyping space and easy to view LEDs:

Arduino LCD game: High Noon

Once more Emmanuel Turner has ported another game to work with an Arduino and our LCD Keypad Shield. In this instalment he brings us the classic game "High Noon" using some clever coding and using PROGMEM to get around the Arduino's memory limit. The game works well and with some imagination is a great interlude, for example:

  

For more information including the sketch and other interesting Arduino projects, visit Emmanuel's siteAnd for more, we're on twitter and Google+, so follow us for news and product updates as well.

 

Instead of building your own LCD module onto a breadboard, save time and move forward with the Freetronics LCD & Keypad shield which contains a bright 16x2 character LCD and five buttons that can be read from only one analog input pin:

Make your own multi-personality fortune teller

For something to scare people or give them a fright during Halloween, consider getting started on this fortune-telling machine. Based around an Arduino board and a .wav file playback shield, a coin acceptor you can find on eBay, a skull and a lot of hardware - you can make a fortune teller with an adjustable personality. The curious customer sets the level of 'evil' using a knob then inserts a coin for the spooky message - for example:

 

Si if you enjoy Halloween or looking to make a fortune-telling machine, this is a goodstart. And for more, we're on twitter and Google+, so follow us for news and product updates as well.

When making your own fortune teller or other project, increase reliability and project lifespan by using a protoshield instead. In doing so, consider our range of ProtoShields. From the tiny LeoStick to the Mega range, we offer a complete range for you to work with.

Using a LeoStick to control garden watering systems

Brendon Poole inherited a defunct garden watering system with the purchase of a new home, and decided to bring it back to life (the watering system, not the house). Although a work in progress, he has successfully created the menu control system and a real-time clock by using the Menu library and various resources.

We look forward to following Brendon's project and the eventual goal of controlling the sprinkler system. For more information, visit his blog here. And for more, we're on twitter and Google+, so follow us for news and product updates as well.

So what is a LeoStick? It's the Arduino Leonardo-compatible board that's cheaper and smaller than the original:

 Apart from being one of the smallest Arduino-compatibles on the market with USB, it also has an onboard RGB LED and piezo which can be used a knock sensor and various tune and sound effects. Plus you can add extra circuitry with the matching protostick! For more information and to order, click here.

Friday, 28 September 2012

Control window blinds with Arduino and the web

Using an Ethernet-enabled Arduino board, motor shield, a stepper motor or two and miscellaneous hardware, Instructables user 'freedomtocreate' has created a system that can open and close window blinds by a variety of methods. Apart from controlling them via a web interface - which also allows programming parameters such as opening and closing times, it can also be programmed to react to temperature and light levels. Below is the layout of the prototype before installation:

Some extra logic may need to be incorporated, for example how would you like the blinds if it's bright and cold? Nevertheless it's a great tutorial and the base for some imaginative work. And for more, we're on twitter and Google+, so follow us for news and product updates as well.


 

When putting together your next Internet-enabled Arduino project - save time, space and money with the Freetronics EtherTen. Apart from being fully Arduino Uno-compatible, it has onboard Ethernet, microSD socket, full USB interface (so you don't need a costly FTDI cable just to upload a sketch!) and supports optional Power-over-Ethernet.

Experimenting with Arduino and RS485 data communication

After some curiosity about RS232 serial communications, Guillaume Dallaire investigated further and started experimenting with RS485. This standard allows more than one device to communicate with a host (such as an Arduino) such as sensors or display devices. That is in fact what Guillaume has demonstrated, and apart from demonstrating the required hardware and RS485 interface ICs he also offers simple code to demonstrate the system. 

You can see how simple it is to implement RS485, and one of the main reasons to use it is you can have a distance of over one hundred meters between devices - much longer than SPI or I2C. To find out more, check out his project page. And for more, we're on twitter and Google+, so follow us for news and product updates as well.

So if this sort of project intrigues you and you're new to Arduino, the first step is a solid board for your projects - our Freetronics Eleven - the Arduino-Uno compatible with low-profile USB socket, onboard prototyping space and easy to view LEDs:

DIY PC Network Status with Arduino

Tasked with monitoring over a dozen PCs in a laboratory setting, Physics professor 'Dr Ayers' has created a complex monitoring device with a very simple and informative display. By using red/green LEDs each PCs status can be determined at a glance. The monitor's host computer runs a cron job once per minute to check the network PCs, and the status for each PC is shown with an LED (red = problem, green = OK, yellow = no idea). Finally the whole lot fits in a standard 5.25" drive bay, for example:

A very 1960s display for a 21st century problem. For the required code and notes, check out the project page. And for more, we're on twitter and Google+, so follow us for news and product updates as well.

If you're looking to make your own status indicator but need more than three colours -  consider the Freetronics RGBLED: module. It includes a bright RGB LED on the top of the board and a WS2801 constant-current, addressable, multi-channel LED driver on the back. This smart module can be daisy-chained, so you can connect a number of these together in a string and drive each of the module colours individually from your microcontroller. For more information and to order, visit the product page.

Wednesday, 26 September 2012

Different Multi-line LED matrix display from an old printer

As part of their efforts for a Belgian "Arduino jam", Instructables user 'jekkos' created a completely different kind of LED matrix display using the remnants of an old inkjet printer. The display also operates in a similar fashion to it's roots - by moving an 8x8 LED matrix one character at a time and displaying each character in turn. A perfect subject for time-lapse photography. Furthermore the whole thing has been interface with a Raspberry Pi to make text entry simple. You can see it in action in the following video:

 

Certainly a different yet an interesting exercise. For a complete breakdown click here. And for more, we're on twitter and Google+, so follow us for news and product updates as well.

If you're an experienced Arduino user and interested in more advanced Arduino projects and usage - get yourself a copy of "Practical Arduino" by Jonathan Oxer and Hugh Blemings:
 

 

Create your own Arduino-based designs, gain an in-depth knowledge of the architecture of Arduino, and learn the easy-to-use Arduino language all in the context of practical projects that you can build yourself at home. Get hands-on experience using a variety of projects and recipes for everything from home automation to test equipment. For more information and to order, click here

Arduino-controlled Optical Theremin

For those wanting a simple and interesting project to introduce someone to the world of Arduino - this could be the ticket. Instructables user 'gwarbeh' has created a theremin (a musical instrument that is played without physical contact) using a light-sensor, Arduino and headphones for audio output. You can make it in less than half an hour, and the results are quite good - for example: 

 

For all the details and Arduino sketch visit the project pageAnd for more, we're on twitter and Google+, so follow us for news and product updates as well.


Looking for a light sensor? Although it can be tempting to use a light-dependent resistor, they're fragile and can give varying results. Instead - consider our LIGHT: light sensor module based around the digital TEMT6000 sensor. It gives consistent and reliable readings, and is incredibly easy to use with our Getting Started guide. For more information and to order, click here!

Remote temperature monitoring with Arduino and GSM

After the hot water system and heat failed in his holiday house, Matt Tilchen needed a way to check that on the new hot water system regularly without having to physically visit the house. Although sending sensor data via the Internet sounded promising, that would incur an unwanted expense of a connection just for some data. Instead he used an Arduino combined with a DS18B20 temperature sensor and a GSM Arduino shield. On a regular basis the Arduino would send the temperature data via SMS to Matt's phone - or if a sudden change in temperature occurs it would SMS immediately. And if it didn't send a message after a period of time - he also knew there would be a problem. Anything to avoid a repeat of the damage shown below:


For details on how the system works and to recreate your own, click here. And for more, we're on twitter and Google+, so follow us for news and product updates as well.

 

To get started with your own temperature-controlled projects, consider using our TEMP: DS18B20-based temperature sensor module:

... or our HUMID: Humidity and Temperature sensor module based on the popular DHT22 sensor unit. Both modules are fully documented and easy to get started with. These are only two of over a dozen of our sensor and outputs modules available now from Freetronics!

DIY Wireless Motion Sensor Array

Matthew over at the code|hack|create site needed to be aware of movement in many places at once, in order to detect the arrival of the courier and movement in other areas of his building. Although placing passive infrared sensors around and wiring them back to a main unit sounds simple, in reality all that wiring is inconvenient and a mess. Therefore Matthew instead connected each PIR to an Arduino and an inexpensive wireless data transmitter. At the receiving end another Arduino to a matched receiver which can then take action once motion in any of the areas has been detected.

For more information about this project, click here. And for more, we're on twitter and Google+, so follow us for news and product updates as well.

If you're interested in using wireless data links with your Arduino project, we have twoconvenient receiver shields - both 315 MHz and 433 Mhz. Combined with the Getting Started guide you'll be up and going in no time. For more information check out theproduct page

Tuesday, 25 September 2012

Make your own quasi-realtime oscilloscope with Arduino

Over at the coolarduino blog they have been working on a variety of analogue-digital (and vice-versa) projects that interface with various Arduino boards. One of these which caught my attention is their quasi-oscilloscope. By using an Arduino Leonardo (or compatible) you can recreate their four-channel quasi-scope. The external circuitry required in this version has been reduced due to the programmable gain amplifier in the board's ATmega32U4 microcontroller. The display is certainly unique - using the serial monitor - for example:

Certainly an interesting example of home-brew test equipment. For more information and plans visit the project page here. And for more, we're on twitter and Google+, so follow us for news and product updates as well.

Looking to recreate this project, or need an Arduino Leonardo-compatible board that's cheaper and smaller than the original? Then consider the Freetronics LeoStick:

 Apart from being one of the smallest Arduino-compatibles on the market with USB, it also has an onboard RGB LED and piezo which can be used a knock sensor and various tune and sound effects. Plus you can add extra circuitry with the matching protostick! For more information and to order, click here.

Controlling servos with Raspberry Pi and Arduino

Prolific author Simon Monk has described a method to allow a Raspberry Pi computer to control typical hobby servos using an Arduino board. User input is received on the RPi via a python script, and codes sent via serial to the Arduino board. These are then interpreted by the Arduino which then controls the servos in the usual way. A quick demonstration has been made by Simon below:

 

An interesting and simple demonstration of showing interaction between the two platforms. They complement each other instead of replacing each other. For more information visit Simon's blog. And for more, we're on twitter and Google+, so follow us for news and product updates as well.

Servos? Arduino? Not sure what that's all about - but would like to know? Then the best way to learn is with out new Experimenter's Kit for Arduino:

The package includes a wide variety of parts, sensors and modules including: a servo motor, lights, buttons, switches, sound, sensors, breadboard, wires and more. Furthermore a Freetronics Eleven Arduino-compatible board is included to make this an extensive hobby experimenter, inventor and starter kit. However we don't leave you alone to figure it all out, included is a great project and instruction booklet, plus access to a supporting web page and software examples. In other words - this is everything you need to get started for a fun range of electronics and Arduino related projects! 

So to get started or for more information and to order, check out the product page

Test your reactions with the "ButtonHero" game

As a simple Arduino-based project and also a fun game, Instructables user "EpicWolverine" has created the reflex-testing game "ButtonHero". In theory the game is easy - there are four buttons with matching LEDs, and you need to press the button matching its LED before then next LED lights. However as you could imagine the period of time decreases after every press, thereby requiring ever-improving reaction time. Here's a quick demonstration:

 

It's a fun game and with a little more work could be housed in a solid enclosure and more usable for other people. To make your own you can find the Arduino sketch, circuit schematic and notes here. And for more, we're on twitter and Google+, so follow us for news and product updates as well.

 

So if this sort of project intrigues you and you're new to Arduino, the first step is a solid board for your projects - our Freetronics Eleven - the Arduino-Uno compatible with low-profile USB socket, onboard prototyping space and easy to view LEDs:

Monday, 24 September 2012

The Connected Weather Station

Using a variety of easy to use components including our Freetronics EtherTen board, Christian Murphy has designed and installed a temperature, humidity and light-level monitor which posts the results to cosm (the online service formerly known as Pachube). Temperature and humidity is measured by a DHT-22 1-wire digital sensor, and the light levels are simply read by measuring a light-dependent resistor. Finally, by mounting the equipment in weatherproof housings under the eaves, the system will survive the elements - as shown below:

For more information on this and other items, check out Christian's blog. And for more, we're on twitter and Google+, so follow us for news and product updates as well.

 

When putting together your next Internet-enabled Arduino project - save time, space and money with the Freetronics EtherTen. Apart from being fully Arduino Uno-compatible, it has onboard Ethernet, microSD socket, full USB interface (so you don't need a costly FTDI cable just to upload a sketch!) and supports optional Power-over-Ethernet.

Arduino Morse code generator with keyboard

Although it isn't used that much these days, and learning Morse code isn't required for amateur radio licensing (in Australia) - there is still an interest in this form of communication. Once again an Arduino board has been used as a Morse code generator, and in this example it reads the key pressed from a PS/2-interface keyboard and plays the matching code. Although a simple version, with some modification I'm sure the keystrokes could be buffered to allow for a better interface.

For more information and to recreate your own, click here. And for more, we're on twitter and Google+, so follow us for news and product updates as well.

 

If you're interested in experimenting with sounds and Arduino, but don't have much time or budget - consider our SOUND: sound and buzzer module:

It can be used as a noise-maker driven by your microcontroller for audible feedback of events, and it can also be used as a knock-detector input to sense events and react to them. Includes a built-in 1M resistor to allow the piezo element to detect shocks. For more information and to order, please visit the product page here

┬ÁSpeech - Speech recognition toolkit for Arduino

Although you're not going to replicate the voice recognition system in that popular smartphone, with µSpeech you can have up to ten words that are recognised in order to execute various commands and so on. Unlike other systems µSpeech doesn't require any training, instead it uses a mathematical algorithm to analyse the sounds' numerical representation and return what was said. Hopefully! According to the website the accuracy is up to 80% for words, so again considering the level of hardware it's a great effort.

For more information, the library download and tutorial visit the project page. And for more, we're on twitter and Google+, so follow us for news and product updates as well.

To test out the µSpeech you'll need an simple electret microphone board, and our Freetronics MIC: microphone and sound module is perfect. 

 

The MIC: contains an integrated dual signal amplifier converts the sound to separate channels for pulse / frequency measurement, and sound volume (pressure) level. Designed to connect straight to an Arduino compatible microcontroller, Analog to Digital converter, or many other circuits. For more information and to order click here

 

The "Ultimate Arduino Doorbell"

Software developer John Montgomery has experimented with an Arduino board, an inexpensive doorbell and a variety of odds and ends to come up with what he has termed the "Ultimate Arduino Doorbell". Perhaps the title is subjective, but John has documented his exploration from the start, culminating with a wireless doorbell that rings an actual bell using a servo driven by the Arduino. Here it is in action:

 

Apart from resulting with a different doorbell, it's always interesting to watch how people experiment and discover. And for more, we're on twitter and Google+, so follow us for news and product updates as well.

 

 

When making your own doorbell or other project, increase reliability and project lifespan by using a protoshield instead. In doing so, consider our range of ProtoShields. From the tiny LeoStick to the Mega range, we offer a complete range for you to work with.

Sunday, 23 September 2012

Compile and Upload Arduino sketches without the IDE

 If the Arduino IDE isn't your preferred code editor, you really enjoy command line operations or you need to integrate the Arduino build process into another application, check out the inotool project. It's a command-line toolkit for Arduino hardware and supports all boards supported in the Arduino IDE and the latest revision sketches. At this stage the took is only supported in Linux and MacOS, and required python on the machine, however it's an interesting start. inotool will take care of the entire process including upload to the board. 

For more information and to download the latest version, click here. And for more, we're on twitter and Google+, so follow us for news and product updates as well.

 

 If you're an experienced Arduino user and interested in more advanced Arduino projects and usage - get yourself a copy of "Practical Arduino" by Jonathan Oxer and Hugh Blemings:

 

Create your own Arduino-based designs, gain an in-depth knowledge of the architecture of Arduino, and learn the easy-to-use Arduino language all in the context of practical projects that you can build yourself at home. Get hands-on experience using a variety of projects and recipes for everything from home automation to test equipment. For more information and to order, click here

Generate algorithmic music with Arduino

Over at the rcarduino blog Duane has published some interesting methods of making sounds with Arduino using algorithmic music. The concept is quite complex yet simple - by using a mathematical formula whose result is sent to a PWM pin, a varying sound can be generated. 

The beauty of the sounds is the minimal code required to generate them - after listening a few times you can image these coming from computers of days gone by. Duane's example allows playback of multiple tunes by pressing a combination of buttons, with a reasonable effect - for example:

 

For more fun and to get started, visit the project page. And for more, we're on twitter and Google+, so follow us for news and product updates as well.

 

So if this sort of project intrigues you and you're new to Arduino, the best way to learn is with out new Experimenter's Kit for Arduino:

The package includes a wide variety of parts, sensors and modules including: a servo motor, lights, buttons, switches, sound, sensors, breadboard, wires and more. Furthermore a Freetronics Eleven Arduino-compatible board is included to make this an extensive hobby experimenter, inventor and starter kit. However we don't leave you alone to figure it all out, included is a great project and instruction booklet, plus access to a supporting web page and software examples. In other words - this is everything you need to get started for a fun range of electronics and Arduino related projects! 

So to get started or for more information and to order, check out the product page

DIY Stopping-point indicator for bicycles

Now for something different ... Instructables user 'axpirina' has created an interesting device for a bicycle. By measuring the current speed and determining the deceleration when the bike is coasting to a stop - it will use a laser pointer controlled by a servo to show where the bike will stop if it continues to freely decelerate. The speed data is determined from the pulses generated by a dynamo, and then some mathematics take care of the rest.

A party trick or the foundation for more interesting projects? You decide. For more, we're on twitter and Google+, so follow us for news and product updates as well.

Small embedded Arduino projects like the indicator above need an even-smaller Arduino-compatible board - so in your next project, consider the Freetronics LeoStick:

 Apart from being one of the smallest Arduino-compatibles on the market with USB, it also has an onboard RGB LED and piezo which can be used a knock sensor and various tune and sound effects. Plus you can add extra circuitry with the matching protostick! For more information and to order, click here.

Friday, 21 September 2012

Determine individual Arduino's USB serial numbers

When working with two or more Arduino-style boards with USB interface on the same computer, sometimes it can be easy to forget which board is using which USB port. With the knowledge that each Arduino has a unique serial number in its' USB interface, Tod Kurt has written a simple program to display all the manufacturer name, USB Vendor ID, Product ID (VID & PID) and serial number data for each board plugged into the PC. By noting which board has what serial number, you'll then know which board is in which port. 


A great utility that can save some hair-pulling when working with multiple Arduino boards. For more information visit Tod's page. And we're on twitter and Google+, so follow us for news and product updates as well.

Do you work with Arduino clones or breadboard your own projects that require a USB interface? Adding one is simple with an FTDI Cable:

Available in 5V and 3.3V versions, you can easily add this USB-serial converter cable to upload sketches to your prototype as easily as if it were a standard board. For more information and to order, click here

Explore intersection of the web and the physical world with Breakout

or a new way to connect your Arduino board with the outside world, have a look at Breakout. According to the designers it was created to enable designers to ptototype functional web-based interfaces with the physical world. It looks to be a very simple method of controlling your Arduino via the web, and in their words:

The popular platform and the Firmata protocol are leveraged to enable users to access physical input and output purely from javascript. This makes it easy for anyone familiar with javascript and basic web development to explore the possibilities of using physical I/O in their web applications. Furthermore, the Breakout framework includes a growing library of hardware abstractions such as buttons, leds, servo motors, accelerometers, gyros, etc enabling the user to easily interface with a range of sensors and actuators using just a few lines of javascript code.

You can even try it out with just a normal Arduino, USB cable and the Breakout software. On their home page is a simple LED on/off example that demonstrates this clearly. The entire system is relatively simple and offers another method of Arduino interaction.


To download their software and test it for yourself, visit the breakout websiteAnd we're on twitter and Google+, so follow us for news and product updates as well.

 

So if this sort of project intrigues you and you're new to Arduino, the best way to learn is with out new Experimenter's Kit for Arduino:

 

The package includes a wide variety of parts, sensors and modules including: a servo motor, lights, buttons, switches, sound, sensors, breadboard, wires and more. Furthermore a Freetronics Eleven Arduino-compatible board is included to make this an extensive hobby experimenter, inventor and starter kit. However we don't leave you alone to figure it all out, included is a great project and instruction booklet, plus access to a supporting web page and software examples. In other words - this is everything you need to get started for a fun range of electronics and Arduino related projects! 

So to get started or for more information and to order, check out the product page

DIY twitter-enabled flush monitor

... or in other words, the twitter-enabled toilet flush monitor. The people at Toronto Hackerspace decided to learn how to make an Arduino send tweets whilst simultaneously showing their disdain for medium by creating a device that detects when the toilet has been flushed, and then tweets the fact to its' followers. Although the whole project may seem silly, it is a fine example on how to send tweets with an Arduino. 

Operation is quite simple - a tilt switch triggers a digital input on the Arduino due to the movement on the flush mechanism, and then the tweet is send. For more information, the sketch and some humour check out the project page. And we're on twitter and Google+, so follow us for news and product updates as well.

Instead of using multiple Arduino devices when building an Internet-enabled project - save time, space and money with the Freetronics EtherTen. Apart from being fully Arduino Uno-compatible, it has onboard Ethernet, microSD socket, full USB interface (so you don't need a costly FTDI cable just to upload a sketch!) and supports optional Power-over-Ethernet.

Making home automation equipment quieter

Freetronics co-founder and home automation expert Jonathan Oxer has published the next fascinating instalment in the Superhouse.TV website that focuses on high technology and automation around the home. In this episode Jonathan discusses making network router equipment much quieter by fitting a temperature/humidity sensor inside the equipment and using the temperature data the hardware fan speed can be reduced relative to it. Watch the episode below:

 

If you're interested in other topics within home automation, check out the rest ofSuperhouse.tv. And we're on twitter and Google+, so follow us for news and product updates as well.

 

If you're looking for a sensor to measure temperature and humidity - check out our HUMID: humidity and temperature sensor module. Designed around the DHT22 sensor, it only requires one digital pin and power - and is easy to use with out Quick Start guide. With a temperature range of -4°C to +125°C with +/-0.5°C accuracy, and humidity at 0-100% with 2-5% accuracy you're ready to measure. For more information and to order, click here

Real-time digital signal processing with Arduino

As part of an experiment with real-time digital signal processing and an Arduino, Amanda Ghassaei has created a device that pitch shifts and distorts incoming audio signals to produce a wide variety of vocal effects. By sampling incoming sound, splitting it into tiny data elements then modiftying them the resulting sound is quite different - therefore having the ability to make various sound effects. This technique is called "granular synthesis". The audio output is generated by a typical R/2R resistor ladder and op-amps; and the whole kaboodle fits in this enclosure:


For more information, a complete tutorial and instructions click here. And we're on twitter and Google+, so follow us for news and product updates as well.

If you're interested in experimenting with sounds and Arduino, but don't have much time or budget - consider our SOUND: sound and buzzer module:

It can be used as a noise-maker driven by your microcontroller for audible feedback of events, and it can also be used as a knock-detector input to sense events and react to them. Includes a built-in 1M resistor to allow the piezo element to detect shocks. For more information and to order, please visit the product page here